Humans have practiced fasting | Max Hospital
  1. Home
  2. Blogs
  3. Endocrinology Diabetes
  4. Humans have practiced fasting

8756 COVID19 positive patients treated across our hospitals till 24th Sept '20

Get Second Opinion

Please provide your phone number with country code

1 + 9 =

Doc Connect

Hospital : 
Max Super Speciality Hospital, Saket
Description: 
  • Robotic Urological Surgery: 15 years journey 
    Dr. Rahul Yadav, Dr. Anant Kumar
  • Robotic surgery is the latest in advanced onco surgical procedures 
    Dr. Harit Chaturvedi
  • Percutaneous balloon aortic valvuloplasty & balloon dilatation of aortic coarctation in a 10 year old child 
    Dr. Neeraj Awasthy, Dr. Sushil Shukla
  • Role of CT/MR imaging and echocardiography in evaluation of valsalva sinus aneurysm 
    Dr. Reena Anand, Dr. Raj Kumar, Dr. Divya Malhotra, Dr. Bharat Aggarwal
  • Risk factors for patients undergoing treatment for Breast Cancer
    Ms. Kanika Arora, Ms. Ritika Samaddar
  • Radiology Case of The Month 
    Dr. Nafisa Shakir Batta, Dr. Dhruv Jain
Date: 
October, 2015 :15
Emergency Call Button

DELHI / NCR : 011-4055 4055

MOHALI : 77107-77107

DEHRADUN : 0135 719 3333

BATHINDA : +91 0164-5212000

 

Bio Medical Waste Report For Shalimar Bagh

Month Red Autoclave(Infected Plastic Waste) Yellow- Incineration(AnatomicalWaste & Soiled Waste) Blue Autoclave (Glass- Bottles) Black Cytotoxic- Incineration( Cytotoxic Contaminated Items) White- Sharp Total Bags Total Weight(In KG's)
  No. of Bags Weight (in KG's) No. of Bags Weight (in KG's) No. of Bags Weight (in KG's) No. of Bags Weight (in KG's) No. of Bags Weight (in KG's)    
Apr-17 924 2963.50 954 2994.10 239 1017.30 103 279.20 1645 606.40 3865 7861.00
May-17 1175 4624.12 1028 3498.40 276 1524.34 87 195.01 1803 823.85 4369 10665.71
Jun-17 1060 4511.45 902 2886.66 293 1324.05 76 194.00 2057 1100.69 4388 10016.85
Jul-17                     0 0.00
Aug-17                     0 0.00
Sep-17                     0 0.00
Oct-17                     0 0.00
Nov-17                     0 0.00
Dec-17                     0 0.00
Jan-18                     0 0.00
Feb-18                     0 0.00
Mar-18                     0 0.00
YTD 3159 12099.065 2884 9379.155 808 3865.69 266 668.705 5505 2530.94 12622 28543.555

Humans have practiced fasting

Home >> Blogs >> Endocrinology Diabetes >> Humans have practiced fasting

Clinical Directorate

For more info please call 8744 888 888 (Delhi – NCR) & 9988 422 333 (Chandigarh Tri-city), or mail at homecare@maxhealthcare.com

March 2, 2020 0 2 minutes, 21 seconds read
Dr. Ambrish Mithal - Max Hospital
Chairman & Head - Endocrinology & Diabetes
Endocrinology & Diabetes

Humans have practiced fasting since time immemorial. Recently there has been a resurgence of interest in Intermittent Fasting (IF).

IF is practiced in many ways, including fasting on alternate days, twice a week, 5 consecutive days a month and others.

However, the most popular form is the concept of 16- hour fasting daily- which means that you confine eating to 8 hours every day. So if you have your breakfast at 8, your last meal has to be at 4 pm. And for the remaining 16 hours, you observe near abstinence from food.

While the benefits claimed for IF are numerous, most people want to use it as a tool for weight loss. Conceptually IF is truly not about what you eat, but about when you eat. It shifts the focus from food composition to food timing. It is based on the understanding that if we starve our body of calories for prolonged periods, the body tends to break down body fats resulting in weight loss.

Some people find IF easier to follow than usual low-calorie diets. There can be hunger pangs initially, but they tend to settle after a few days. IF can be a realistic and effective approach for weight loss and diabetes prevention. It can lessen inflammation, and may even enhance brain function. Weight loss per se depends more on the total calorie intake

over 24 hours rather than the timing. However, improvement in metabolic parameters is much greater with IF.

The best results with IF seem to be when we mimic our natural body clock, i.e eat in the day and fast at night. Most studies have used 7 am to 3 pm as the

eating window. It is likely that 8 to 4, or 9 to 5, or even 10 to 6 will work. But

it is unlikely that a pattern of eating through the night and fasting during the day  will give similar results, as it contradicts our normal body rhythm.

Despite the concept being based on timing rather than food composition, the best results will only be seen if we avoid high sugar, high fat, calorie-dense food and stick to fruits and veggies, fiber, healthy protein, and healthy fats. Snacking is a total no-no. Not everyone is a candidate for IF. Those who tend to get a lot of “acidity” symptoms when they go without food should avoid IF. More importantly, if you have diabetes, you need to be careful. If you are on drugs that do  not produce low blood sugar- like Metformin, gliptins or the new SGLT2 inhibitors, it’s fine to opt for IF. In case you are on insulin or  sulphonyureas (glimeperide, gliclazide) you are at risk for hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) and IF is best avoided. Individuals with Type 1 diabetes should stay clear of all fasting regimens.

Ask your doctor if intermittent fasting is for you before you embark on this path.

Related Articles

Featured Doctors

Book an Appointment